And Now For Something Completely Machinima

Completely Machinima 5.2 Films of the Month June 2021

June 10, 2021 Ricky Grove and Phil Rice Season 5 Episode 2
And Now For Something Completely Machinima
Completely Machinima 5.2 Films of the Month June 2021
Chapters
And Now For Something Completely Machinima
Completely Machinima 5.2 Films of the Month June 2021
Jun 10, 2021 Season 5 Episode 2
Ricky Grove and Phil Rice

Tracy, Ricky, Damien and Phil review a super-diverse set of short films made in Unreal Engine, Animal Crossing, Flight Simulator X, GTA V, and Garry's Mod.

Full notes for this episode are available at:
https://completelymachinima.com/2021/06/10/completely-machinima-5-2-films-of-the-month-june-2021/

Show Notes Transcript

Tracy, Ricky, Damien and Phil review a super-diverse set of short films made in Unreal Engine, Animal Crossing, Flight Simulator X, GTA V, and Garry's Mod.

Full notes for this episode are available at:
https://completelymachinima.com/2021/06/10/completely-machinima-5-2-films-of-the-month-june-2021/

Phil Rice:

Welcome to and now for something completely machinima, the podcast about machinima, real time filmmaking and VR. I'm your host Phil, otherwise known as Overman with a silent z and a silent s, but you can call me 'The King.' With me as my co hosts, Ricky Grove

Ricky Grove:

Yo!

Phil Rice:

Damien Valentine

Damien Valentine:

Hello there.

Phil Rice:

And Tracy Harwood.

Tracy Harwood:

Hello.

Phil Rice:

So today, we're gonna be talking about our film picks.

Ricky Grove:

Yeah, my favorite part.

Phil Rice:

This is my favorite part too.

Ricky Grove:

Oh, yeah.

Tracy Harwood:

This is the bit where I get trounced usually, though.

Ricky Grove:

No, no, no. Yes, yes, yes.

Phil Rice:

So how this works, is typically we just kind of go out and find films on our own and, and stumble across things, or we get recommendations sent to us. And we use, we use a service called Milanote, which is kind of like, it's like Evernote on steroids. And it's all online. And you can collect together different clips and links and notes. That's, that's if you want to lift the hood on how this show is produced, that's how we do it. We use that to organize all that information, and eventually cobble it down to an outline for a particular episode.

Ricky Grove:

Sort of like digital whiteboard for everybody put up pieces of information, you comment on it. Very helpful.

Phil Rice:

Yeah, it's been very helpful. So we're gonna start off with Tracy, your pick for this month, was called Rick

Pearce:

Bucket List?

Tracy Harwood:

Well, it's by Rick Pearce. And the film itself is called The Bucket List. And it's a piece that's been made in Unreal Engine. It's the story of two time traveling robots with a bucket list of places to visit on Earth. The theme of this holiday is a manmade disasters kind of thing. And these two robots go through a whole list of disaster zones from Chernobyl, to some kind of dead ship yard to the Australian bushfires. And intriguingly, there are no people in that story. In story, the the various dates in time suggests that people are still around those. So it's, it's not, it's just that they're not in the in the visited location. So it's a it's a movie with with an environmental message, which is kind of an interesting theme, which we'll get onto a bit later on as well. So the theme of The Bucket List is is very much in the style of this sort of night, this 2007 film directed by Rob Reiner with Nicholson and Freeman, where the interplay between these characters unfolds into into some sort of provocative form of rivalry and banter between these robots. It's got some really funny moments in it, and been here before on another theme holiday queuing for no reason, misinterpreting historical artifacts and all those kinds of things that we do as tourists on a foreign land. And if we're traveling with that smartass mate that continually corrects us. So all of those kinds of things are going on. But I also get another bit of a message in here, which is that of just traveling to take snaps. So you've been here seems to be somewhat Well, I thought it was somewhat of a unique human tourist tendency. So there's kind of references to that as a bit of a bit of a pop puppet, selfie culture two, I think. And, you know, given given that it's, you know, Unreal given the Rick Pearce is not nearly an experience producer of content. In fact, he's a co founder of Spectre Studios, which is a leading Australian virtual production and design studio with a really impressive resume a you know, you can expect that this film isn't indie, sort of typical, you know, typical newbie, kind of quality if you like, in fact, the film is produced by peers as part of his 2021 winter Unreal fellowship. So, you know, of course, you'd expect things like lighting and editing to be really good and it is, so yeah. I really enjoyed it. What did you guys think?

Phil Rice:

I thought it was gorgeous. And yeah, very, very, very intriguing. I don't know that looking at it, one would know that it was real time animation. It's that level of quality. It looks rendered, if you will. Yeah, it's great.

Damien Valentine:

I kind of got a Pixar kind of vibe from watching it, because of how good it looks. They've done a really good job with Unreal. And it's kind of reminded of people who do actually go on holidays to Chernobyl to have that you can go there is not really, yeah, you can go there and you can have a tour around and you can look around the ruins of the city. I don't think I would personally want to do that. But I've heard it's something that people do. And the other one It reminds me of is people go on tours of abandoned buildings, or disused subway stations and things like that.

Ricky Grove:

They call it 'ruin porn.'

Damien Valentine:

Okay.

Phil Rice:

Is that a real term?

Ricky Grove:

Yeah, uh-huh.

Tracy Harwood:

Yeah, well, it's very much into that. I think it's, I think it's a lot of depths in this story, I think. I think it's really very well done. Really fun.

Ricky Grove:

The movie was a really interesting movie for me, because I didn't like it at all when I first watched it. And I was thinking, Well, let's think about that. So over a period of a couple days, I watched it again, and I started thinking, and it was, it's a film that made me realize a few things. I wanted to share them with you. It made me realize why I like machinima so much. Because I've also been rereading your great pioneers in machinima watkinsville, I've been thinking a lot of the early machinima filmmakers and going back and watching some of the films. What this film has, is a kind of sheen of professionalism to it, if there's no question, it's absolutely gorgeous. It's flawlessly animated. It uses a sentimental and very popular trope of the odd couple put together. It's Pixar, like in that notion, because that sense of humor, you got the fastidious robot and then you've got the sort of slow moving, slow thinking character these pleasing. The whole thing is just it's kind of a manufactured quality to it. And it makes me realize is that any number of good studios could make this film. You know, it lacks that personal touch that I love in machinima, that handmade quality. For example, we're going to be talking about some other films that are made in Grand Theft Auto that Phil chose, that have all sorts of flaws in them. little bits of trouble and rendering of animation that doesn't quite work. And I think that's the thing that attracts me to machinima is that crafted handmade quality. And this one seems to be a corporate manufactured items slip, like a Gucci handbag. You know what I mean? And those, that's great. I mean, I can understand why anybody would admire that. But it doesn't work for me. I like machinima that has a personality to it. That isn't generic. I like the flaws in certain a lot of machinima phones. So for that reason, the film, even though it was very well made, didn't work for me, because I didn't believe the story. It was too slick to sentimental. And it just didn't work. didn't work for me. But But I do want to thank you for picking it up. Because it led me to understand something that I under otherwise, I'm not sure I would have understood because I really probed I really probe as to why I didn't like this film. And I think that's important. It's a personal preference. You know, perhaps when I was 19, I would have said anybody who likes this film as a fool, but that's the reason why I like machinima. I like that handcrafted quality. I left all of that Pixar status. The reason why I don't like Disney films. They're too sentimental. They're too perfect. That's not the world that I live in. You know what I mean?

Tracy Harwood:

Do you think that's a general challenge that we're going to see with the Unreal creator?

Ricky Grove:

I do I do. That was another I didn't want to go into it because I didn't want to make it's a longer conversation. But all of that game Unity and Unreal game based stuff does flawless animations flawless rendering. If you look at even stuff made in GTA still has problems, you'll have a stretched material. You know, there isn't quite the UV map on it doesn't quite work. So it's got an odd look to it. Well, there's no depth of field in a shot. It's all flat. I love that. I just love that because it shows that somebody, it's their personal story. It's not a story made by a team of professionals have been doing it for 25 years, you know.

Phil Rice:

So you found a film this week, in if I if you had challenged me last time we got together, Phil, make a list of the machinima engines that are possible in the order that you think people will make compelling machinima and I would think Animal Crossing would be way on the bottom of the list. But what you found was remarkable. So tell us about it.

Ricky Grove:

Wow. You know, I have gotten more interesting machinima films, creating a individual Google search. You know, on Google, you can create a search with all sorts of keywords in it. And a major search and it will search out and delivered to you every day. A list of articles and media and stuff that that comes up. I get machinimas Google search every day and I go I religiously go through all of the entries now. 90% of them are just useless. You know, how many times Am I going to see a thing on? Yeah, so Machinima Inc does not had withdrawal of their films from YouTube. Just Ah, but there are gems in there. And so one day, a couple weeks ago, this film shows up called Animal Crossing Movie Part 1 by Evil Imp. And I thought well that's intriguing. I clicked on it. Boom. 15 minutes later, I come back to reality from a dream. It is such an interesting film. And of course, that led me to start trying to discover how do you actually make machinima in Animal Crossing? Well, apparently the company. It's a PlayStation, I believe.

Damien Valentine:

Nintendo Switch.

Ricky Grove:

Anyway, one of those two. They recently released an update that allowed users to be able to move the camera. Okay, it basically gave you machinima tools. And there are some mods are created in order for you to create sets and debt and dress all of the sets. And this filmmaker guy named Evil Imp on YouTube has made three dozen films in in Animal Crossing, using all of those sweet little characters. That's cute. irrepressibly the kind of thing where if you have diabetes, you better go take some pills for it while you're watching it because it's gonna kill you with this sweetness. And yet he does that thing that I absolutely love at machinima. He plays against the grain of the of the game, you know what I mean? What he, what he writes, he writes is dark and disturbing, and hilarious black humor. So it was hard choosing films, because so many of them are so good, but he did a trilogy of thumbs. Animal Crossing Movie Part One, Two and Three. And there he's there's talk about him releasing the fourth one. And it's essentially for three completely different they have carryover characters, okay, and a carry over overarching plotline. But they're completely three completely different worlds that he explores. The first one is a sort of combination, Aliens and Exorcist possession thing. The second one is a Harry Potter sort of thing. And the third one escapes my memory what the style of it is, but anyway, they're absolutely delicious. They're, they're lit very dramatically. I he one of the big problems and here's again, an example of limitation creates an opportunity to create something there's no lip sync any of them all they do is sort of do this sort of odd little head bobbing movement, you know, and then occasional surprise or a little bubble that comes off of their head. He created an entire nonsense language that is spoken Which allows him to use subtitles. So he writes the dialogue of the characters in subtitles while this on. And it is just a brilliant choice to solve that problem of no lip sing. And the story is essentially the story of this group of people who have a sweet little characters, including one robot, who are being pursued across the storylines by this Sauron like character, who is our big white rabbit. And I want to tell you, this is one of the scariest rabbits I've ever seen. Because this thing shows up with this lighting that's up lighting that lumen, it's its face, and in the end, it becomes it like takes possession over people, it shows up in unusual places. And it it turns people into sort of crazy monsters. It's hard to describe the film plot without actually giving away things. But I just love this film. And I'm a real I'm a real fan of evil lamps, movies, and I urge you to discover somebody who can take the limitations of a game engine and the quality, the style of it and play against it to make horror films, monster movies, science fiction films, anything you can think of that are witty, funny, and alive in every way that the Unreal. bucket list didn't work for me, the S Animal Crossing movie does, even though there's no comparison in terms of quality of the visuals or the characters. But it has this handmade quality, this personal storytelling, and it's weird, it does get word that just drew me in. I've watched the the trilogy at least three times now. And every time it's just so much fun. And he manages to put in an environmental theme. He manages to have scenes that are at times touching. Because once you get to know the characters, you know what their background is, so you start to feel for them, and scenes that are extremely funny in the middle of horror, which is hard to do. So I hope people will love this film. And I'm very interested to hear what you guys have to say.

Damien Valentine:

Well, it reminds me of a discussion we had a few episodes ago about making machinima on mobile platforms. And I think we all pretty much agree that that wasn't really something we could do. And then you just cover this film, which has made him a Nintendo Switch, which is a portable device. You can eat there's two versions of it. There's one you can hook up to a TV, but you can also pull the tablet out and just play on it. handheld, and then there's just the pure handheld one. I don't know which one, which of these devices was used for this. But as far as the game of this concern that are identical, so you can use just use the portable one and make something with it. And that's what when I was watching the film, I was remembering our discussion about it. And it was done so well.

Tracy Harwood:

Yeah, brilliantly. I tell you, the one thing that stood out for me was the actual soundscape design. Which you know, I was listening to it with with headset on. But a couple of points It's final. And so you know, you've got stuff going on, and it goes across, across you. It's absolutely brilliantly done. The whole kind of soundscape really is very, very impressive, I think. A sort of Animal Crossing type of setting. Oh, said no, we expect at all and it's quite scary in places I have to admit.

Ricky Grove:

It is, isn't it? And you um, you applaud the creativity of the filmmaker, for being able to scare you with characters were certainly not designed to do that.

Tracy Harwood:

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. He clearly used a whole load of mods, because when I was looking at his credit lists, he kind of got a whole, you know, a whole bunch of things that he imported, or used in the editing of, I think it's probably better description of it. So quite how he did that. I don't really know.

Damien Valentine:

The game has this feature where you can customize textures and things and then you can share them with its own built in online service. So you can draw something as basic as pixel art and then you upload it and you get a QR code so you can share that with your friends and there are whole websites out there dedicated to collecting QR codes for these different designs.

Ricky Grove:

Wow. Help me understand something Damien. Now I was my understanding that the Animal Crossing was originally released on the Nintendo I think and so he created it on Twitch, which is a device that uses Nintendo technology?

Damien Valentine:

Yeah, it's basically a Nintendo console. So you had the Wii and then they had the Wii U. But then the latest one is the the Switch. And so the vein unit, there's two different versions of the console is one where you have this base, which you plug into the TV. And then you kind of have this tablet with controllers on each side, which you can pull out. And you can sit down and just look at the screen, you can take it, if you want to go somewhere, you can take it with you. And it's a portable device. Otherwise, you can plug it into the back into the dock and then watch it on TV. Yeah, and then just the handheld one, which is a smaller device, but the hardware is identical. So you can play exactly the same games, and do all the same capabilities as the main one.

Ricky Grove:

I'd like to know his workflow and background on this. I think I'm gonna contact him and see if I can work out a an interview with him to find out more. Because I've been really intrigued with being able to make machinima on iPads and mobile devices. And I'd like to learn more about it.

Damien Valentine:

I'd be interested to see as well,

Ricky Grove:

Phil, what were your thoughts?

Phil Rice:

I loved it. was I was caught completely by surprise. I of course, first saw the title when you shared it on our board and I thought Animal Crossing? When it first came out, my kids were nuts for it. And I just kind of watched it and it kind of felt like that it was taking place in animation you'd see on like a children's television show or something.

Ricky Grove:

Sesame Street or something.

Phil Rice:

There's old show, Little Einsteins. There's these just cartoonish characters with the big heads and expressive faces and all that. And I just thought Well, I'm glad you guys are liking it. But, "Dad you want to play too?" Uh, no. So I wasn't expecting much. And I was my my experience was the same as you described Ricky. 15 minutes later, it's like, wow, I could not take my eyes off the screen. It's wonderfully done. And a surprising amount of polish. For what you know, for the kind of movie that it is. It's beautiful, you know, you know, once you if you accept the aesthetic that that game presents, then it's rather gorgeous. Within those within that definition. It's it's Yeah, it was nicely done.

Damien Valentine:

Strangely, I don't think it would work. If you did it in a game, you'd expect that kind of story to be told him.

Phil Rice:

I think you're right.

Damien Valentine:

If you use a sci fi game, it just wouldn't have captured our attention quite the same way.

Ricky Grove:

That's a good point, Damien.

Phil Rice:

yeah, I think that juxtaposition is part of what elevates it. Absolutely.

Tracy Harwood:

I also don't think it would work if you didn't have the same kind of sound design with it as well. Because I think it's sound design that really pulls it together.

Ricky Grove:

Well, if I get this interview, and that's one of the things I'll ask him, Tracy, his work on the sound.

Phil Rice:

a frankly for me a very unusual pick as well, I think yes, if there was anything below the list of engines, I would guess we'd see interesting content come from Flight Simulator X wouldn't rank high on that, tell us tell us about what you found.

Damien Valentine:

So I've been film called Bomb Threats by AirForceProud95. And I've been following his videos for quite some time. And he, what he does, he plays flight simulator x. And I don't know if he stages it, or if he just lets the other players have fun and sees what happened. But he himself was a qualified pilot. So he knows all of the terminology, he knows all the procedures. And I know a lot of his streams and one of his videos, he acts like he's taking it deadly seriously. And for me, the humor of it is how he interacts with people who have absolutely no idea what they're doing. And this video, bomb threat is a perfect example of this, he is the pilot of the plane, contacting the air traffic control, requesting permission to take off from the airport he's at, and the other people doing the air traffic control, have absolutely no idea what they're doing this, they're trying to say it's the first day on the job, and going backwards and forwards between them. until it gets to a point where one of them actually mentioned something about a bomb in the airport. And obviously, he knows what the correct procedures would be. If if he was a bomb threat at the airport. And they're telling him to take off. He said, No, you can't do that. You've got to unload the passengers and all this kind of stuff. And it just goes downhill from there. And all of his videos are like this. But like, along those lines, sometimes he's a pilot, sometimes he's in hf control, talking to pilots who have no idea what they're doing. But this is the one I decided to choose. And it's a very hard decision to make, because there are so many good videos that he's made to choose from. So I'd be very interested in what you guys thought of it.

Tracy Harwood:

Well, I you know, I didn't know he was a pilot, but but one of the things I thought was I don't know how the guy managed to stay in character so much. Yes, yes. And clearly, he's not in character that is him, which is brilliant. So he's either he's either, you know, very dedicated to it is a pilot, or is totally addicted to this player. pitch, which I thought was brilliant. But for me, the absolute star of this one was actually the dog clearly had a major role directing the narrative, which, which I thought was very impressive. So you know, he goes from being what does it bomb squad to attack squad to bring your pet to work asset to, you know, being sat at home, he really is the star of that particular. particular one, I thought it was really, really, really well done. And I suppose really, the other thing to say about this is, in my view, there are kind of two very different types of Let's Play maybe there are more, but two that I can differentiate between one whether the player's character drives it. But I didn't think that was this one. I thought this is an example of the other one where the the gameplay emotion drives it. So, you know, I think, yeah, it is an example of Let's Play, but it's kind of different one to some of the ones that we've had. I can't remember the ones then Phil, that you talked about a couple of episodes back where it was all about that character, that person playing the game with it was in The Sims

Damien Valentine:

Oh the labyrinth one?

Tracy Harwood:

Yes. Yes, that's it. Yeah. But this is a slightly different sort of Let's Play to that. I think. Great. Great, though. I really enjoyed it. Thanks for putting it up there.

Ricky Grove:

A million views. It had 1,400,000 views. That particular episode, which just astounded me in it. The obviously the comedy, The improv comedy and it was of a high order. I mean, with background of professional acting, I know what improv is and being able to do cold improv like that as hard. And you know, you mentioned Tracy the guy being able to keep himself under control. That is not as an easy thing to do. And that guy was just brilliant at it. Absolutely bring in it. Just wide range of indignation and annoyance and outright anger and hostility and acceptance and rejection. I mean, at one point, I think he says, I'm gonna put you on report, and the guys talk him out of doing it, you know, that all was just peerless. What disappointed me was the entertainment to any visual elements in the film, I mean, they didn't even make a token effort to film any sort of parallel visual story. I mean, I'm not asking for a shot every, you know, every other whenever a subject changes, but at least a shot of them taxiing out or coming back a wide shot, they just stayed on two shots, the entire thing. Now, I suppose that works for 1,400,000 people, but I'm the guy underneath the bridge. And I just thought that part of it sucked. And I thought it was stupid for them not to at least add some elements to that. But obviously, a million and a half people disagree with me.

Damien Valentine:

There are some others other videos where he does start learning how to do that he's mixing up this, the sorts of different camera angles to show but

Ricky Grove:

well, I wish they would have done that. And this one, because it would have made it much more, they would have made it more believable, it would have added a little more reality to it. You know what I mean? As it was it was sort of a still picture. With a voice, you know, you didn't even need the visuals, you know?

Phil Rice:

There is no audio equivalent to the community and environment of YouTube, right. So somebody has a song to release or whatever the focus is the audio. And they'll just release it on YouTube, because that's where people are. But often it's just a still image of the album cover whatever. I feel like that that was just that the audio was the main thing, you know, that the that crank call aspect was was really the main product. And then it's a matter of, well, let's distribute this where where people can see it. So it wouldn't surprise me at all, if that still image we saw wasn't added after the fact, you know, just as to put something there. And it is it's a minimal effort. situation. The audio was the main work. Like I think we've all acknowledged that the what went on there was really, that was the production. So I'm, I enjoyed that part of it. And I'm encouraged and excited to hear that. It sounds like he's starting to, to reach into some other areas to turn these into actual visual visual productions as well. Because I think there's some some real talent there. So I'm looking forward to that.

Ricky Grove:

Me too.

Tracy Harwood:

You know, I'm actually relieved to hear you say that he is a real pilot because you kind of think you hear about people learning how to fly using these, these simulators and whatnot. You can think of all the flights that you've sat on where you've heard that voice, that same voice as he got in that that video and the fact that he is actually a pilot gives you a little bit of comfort.

Ricky Grove:

There's a certain tone, a certain tone and the way he speaks. He's almost commanding. He's got Yeah, he's got it down pat.

Phil Rice:

Yeah, tone and cadence. Yeah,

Damien Valentine:

There's some live action videos. He's got this channel where you see him flying real planes, yeah.

Ricky Grove:

I wanted to share with you the Milan Machinima Festival does. Every month they do a series of videos. And this month, they chose up of course on Grand Theft Auto, Grand Theft Auto V video, and it's of a pilot, who which end this is what made me think of it. A pilot who has a very bad day, he crashes on his drive into the airport, he gets on the plane, he goes out he ends up crashing on something else. Now I have no idea how this equated to some sort of art piece in their minds. But it made me realize is that what the movie lacked was exactly what this video that you chose Damien has, which is a sort of a live-ness of a story in a real human interaction and the sort of absurdity of people pretending to be experts on something that they're obviously not. So in a way I would have substituted this movie in the Milan Machinima Festival for the other one which is pretentious and, and boring. If you if you enjoy the humor but didn't necessarily Enjoy the video alongside that, check out some of his other new more recent videos and you still get the humor but then you get the other more cinematic elements to it as well. I will do that.

Damien Valentine:

He released one a few weeks ago where a group of pilots trying to learn 747 jets on aircraft carriers... with mixed results.

Phil Rice:

My pick is not in an unusual engine this time around, but it is an unconventional use of that engine, or not what not what you would necessarily expect from Grand Theft Auto V. And this is actually a, I'm going to call it a film, but it's a pair of films one's called, let's see, Onto the Land. And the other is called Into the Deep. And they are both kind of parodies of, you know, the David Attenborough nature documentary, but filmed and created entirely within the world of Grand Theft Auto V, for me, there is much a showcase of just the splendid diversity of virtual life that they've put into that game, that they, in my opinion, they went even further with it in Red Dead Redemption 2, which we could get into if we wanted to, but amazing variety of wildlife and scenery and the the geology I guess. Just wonderful. So it's it's very much a, a creation of imitation, you know, it's which many people get their start in this thing. By doing that, by imitating existing art forms, maybe they're imitating a commercial or a particular TV show or a scene from a movie or whatever, this falls into that category. It's just a really well done one. And it doesn't quite fly in the face of, of GTA as much as we feel like the Animal Crossing movie did in terms of, you know, going against expectations really strongly. But it but it kind of does. And I really enjoyed it. I think this was actually originally referred to me by you, Ricky. And I ended up having it as a pick of mine, because I just loved it so much. But what did you guys think?

Ricky Grove:

I loved it, I was very impressed with it. One of the things that I particularly admired in the creativity of the director was, whereas the game is an urban game. Essentially, this is a documentary set in rural areas of the design, and it just shows you how unique The game is because obviously, this person didn't want to go in running pedestrians over fighting the police or doing a bank heist or serial killing or anything like that. He went out and he explored the oceans nearby. And underneath that it was actually peopled with fish and different types of marine life. And he went out on the slopes of the hills. And living here in Los Angeles, I do a lot of walking and hiking up in those areas. And they got it down pat. There's a certain lonely quality to it out there, the wind is constant. And yet the visuals are absolutely beautiful. You can see all the way up to the ocean. So I was really impressed with the fact that the guy in a way he did work outside of the constructs of the game, because the game like I said is focused on police crime. That's what most people do. And yet there are these other aspects of it that are just equally as well design. Now when I first started watching it, I thought it was a satire. Because of the narrator's excellent impersonation of Richard Attenborough certain Richard Attenborough, who has a very particular kind of cadence. I won't try it myself because it's, it's not an easy one to get. But I went back and I listened to several Richard Attenborough narrated a nature documentaries. And this guy has got it down pat, he also has got the writing down pad, they sort of crisis, the sort of scene of crisis between the hunter and the prey, the innocent victim and how sad that is, and yet we have to move on that's nature, then then move on. You know what I mean? It moves on to another element of he, he's just got that perfectly down pat. And then I realized that it's not satire. It's an homage to that kind of thing. So what he does is a magical creation, of, of moving from satire into an original creation based on something that he knows really well which is, he probably is a big watcher and a lover of, of those nature documentaries. And he wanted to do one, an imaginary documentary, which actually actually becomes a nature documentary, not a parody of one, not a satire of one in the second one Which is underneath it, which is slightly less less successful than the first one, I think because he looks through he uses this device of this underwater machine that you that he does a point of view. And sometimes that sort of restricts the, the range of what you can actually see. And then he sometimes has this odd person who's swimming. And you think, well, how in the world can they be down there so long, you know what I mean? But then you just give it give it up. But the thing is, is there was a scene in which a young killer killer whale with a pod of killer whales, and they're teaching the killer whale how to dive and feed, and the calf doesn't manage it and gets the bends and ends up being at the top near the water and the mother keeps trying to encourage the, the young killer calf to come with them. And it won't. And he has a thing and will it's another sad story of natural selection, you know, and then he moves on, but not in a comic way. I mean, there's genuine, I love animals and I it really pains me when I see animals who die and who are our victim of nature's natural selection. And so I was thinking here I am watching a documentary made in Grand Theft Auto V, in which I'm near tears over the this sort of half nice rendered scene of a killer calf. What better work can you do than that as a storyteller? What better work can you do than that? So I just loved him and I'm I'm a real big fan of 8-bit Bastard the guy that created I assume it's a guy.

Tracy Harwood:

Yeah, Alec Cheney.

Ricky Grove:

Oh, okay. I just loved them. I thought they were fantastic. And and I'm really glad you picked them Phil,

Tracy Harwood:

Five years old. That's the bit that you know, I picked up on the fact that these were five years old and it's proper David Attenborough style proper for the like you said the Voice the the cadence and the whole lot but but the narration is very much in Los Santos and Blaine County, in the in the game because you know, he doesn't quite get get the descriptions right. But absolutely wonderful. And the bit again, that makes it is the music the users it in such a dramatic role to try to convey to convey the you know, the the cougar going on the kill. And you know, in the in the death of the, the killer whale calf and all of that kind of stuff is all done through the soundscape design as well. And it's beautifully done. I think that side of it. Not withstanding the visuals, I looked this guy up, he had a two and a half year hiatus between right creating these and he's just released a load of stuff that he's created in Red Dead Redemption 2.

Ricky Grove:

Oh

Phil Rice:

Oh, awesome, gonna look at that.

Tracy Harwood:

Although probably now he's going to be a victim of some of the things that you were talking about. Earlier today, Phil, which will be a real shame, I think but yeah, I love this stuff. It was. Yeah, I almost cried too at it, it's hilarious.

Ricky Grove:

Yeah.

Damien Valentine:

Yeah, I had a similar reaction. That whale scene really got to me. And I, I can't like the rest of you. I was really impressed that he managed to take the is obviously a big fan of the Attenborough documentaries, and he's recreated that perfectly. One of the things I came to mind when I was watching it was GTA kind of presents itself as a living world. So you can imagine the characters in that world sitting down to watch TV, and this documentary would be what they're watching. Or you could go into your watch. It's playing as a playing as a character you go in, and you can watch on TV. And it because it's exploring the virtual world in a way that those characters in that world would find interesting.

Ricky Grove:

That's an interesting point.

Damien Valentine:

Yeah. If that's what was going else was going through my mind. I don't know what else I can see. Other than I really enjoyed both of these two films. I really like the way they captured the Attenborough style was a big fan of Attenborough as well. And you guys already said what I would say, I'll just be repeating what you said. So

Ricky Grove:

I wonder whether he created a script based on his explorations, or he explored and then a script came out of that, you know, I mean, one inside out outside in kind of thing. I suspect that he was probably exploring and saw all this stuff and said, Well, I like Attenborough or maybe he just started doing his improvising. His own Attenborough thing it's about hey, I could make a faux documentary out of this. Anyway, it'd be interesting to find out

Tracy Harwood:

I mean, the other thing to say of course is the ambient sounds of the game are really quite incredible, aren't they? I mean, the bird song the environmental sounds the water. Like I'm guessing that's also out of the game you can you can kind of almost smell the land. It's so beautiful. And as the as a producer says no, no mods, we're using the making of the of the films particularly in Red Dead Redemption 2, you must have a look at those. He's, he's created something called The Five States, which is a documentary series, which is very cool. Kind of wonderful as well, but you know, the soundscapes beautiful, I think.

Ricky Grove:

I'll definitely check those out. Thanks for the tip Tracy.

Phil Rice:

So every once in a while, actually, it seems like every episode where we discuss films, we give one person what we call their gratuitous second pick. So by default, we all pick just one movie, and one person will get to pick two and it's just kind of whoever has multiple picks this this month. It's me. And in keeping with the theme of serious homages. I found a documentary film that talks about chiropractic medicine. And it is called The Benefits of Chiropractic Medicine. The title of the full title is longer than that, but this is a movie made in Garry's Mod. And it starts off as well the whole thing kind of plays like a long form television commercial, right. But playing into some of the various zany kinds of poses and movements and animations that you can do in Garry's Mod. There's really nothing that looks quite like Garry's Mod when when someone's using it in that way. Obviously, Garry's Mod can be used to do stuff that doesn't look cartoonish and wacky. This guy, this guy went the other way, a bit. And so it's this very satirical is not the right word cynical, sarcastic portrayal of this chiropractor. And then he of course, actually goes through the scenes of doing the chiropractic on this person with just these crazy contortions. And just delicious, Foley have some kind of sounds like he grabbed like, several stalks of celery (crunch). You know, as the guy's getting his back worked on. And I'm watching this thing, and I'm just thinking, What in the world is this? Then there's a second phase of the movie, where it's these, these two Australian young men. Kind of like a reality TV type of interview. "Oh, this doctor is so great." And and then there's a third section. And I'm going to just tell everybody right now, watch the first section of this movie, because the first section is hysterical, and plays into all that weird, quirky animation. The second is kind of a throwaway. If you don't know what he's specifically referring to there, which I'll get into it. You can you can take it or leave it. The third one. It's like if you've ever watched Family Guy, where they take a joke deliberately too far, you know, the humor goes too far it's too gross or too over the top or whatever. This falls in that category. It's just tasteless. I'm not even going to describe it. You know, it obviously didn't get the video in any kind of trouble on YouTube. So it's not you know, x rated or anything, but just I just found it in very poor taste. Forget about that. Just Just cut that off. And just to set that over here. This first part is hilarious. So even if you don't know what it's referring to, that first section, to me was just the best that Garry's Mod can offer in terms of just That crazy, zany mess. Let me real quick before I get some, some reaction from you guys on the film. Let me tell you the bizarre coincidence that led me to understand what this video is referring to. Because honestly, okay, so there's a phrase where you say something is that's above my paygrade. What is that phrase when we're talking about the age of a person, because basically, I'm way too old to be someone who should understand this. But because of something I happen to watch, just prior to this film, I get it. In fact, maybe that's why it turned up in my list or something. There's a YouTuber, by the name of Leon Lush. And he does, he's a, I want to say 30 something guy who does commentary on other stuff going on on the internet, his audience is generally going to be younger than than the group I fall into. And I admire his craft. He's good at what he does. He's kind of crass, very bombastic display. And he's successful. So you know, I've kind of he's one of the people that I watched to just kind of study and learn from and all that. Anyway, he did a video exposing a pair of young Australian YouTubers, who had done a series of videos a few years ago, where they basically got on there and pretended, pretended that one of them was terminally ill, for clickbait purposes, really kind of revolting. And so he's doing this expert essay on that. And they ended up doing a video in that series, where they went from Australia, I think they were in Perth to the US, West Coast, Los Angeles area somewhere and went to visit a chiropractor because, quote, "this chiropractor can cure any disease." Yeah, they were serious. And trying to sell this as an idea. And they showed being in that guy's office and he's saying, Oh, yeah, you know, I mean, there are legit chiropractors out there. Okay. They can do remarkable things for people. And then there's the quacks, which are part of all parts of the medical industry, I think. Chiropractors tend to get a bad rap, but there are good people in that field. This guy's not one of them. This is a kook. Who was overselling his shaman like abilities. This is all real. Like for this, this video. And so Leon Lush's video is exposing that fraud. This Garry's Mod chiropractor video is further satirizing those guys who did that who faked illness, and got it "cured" by a chiropractor, supposedly.

Ricky Grove:

I see.

Phil Rice:

So that's where this all comes from. It's just this kind of raging disgust against this, for lack of a better word malpractice. It kinda it's, it gets so angry near the end there that the section that I not recommend watching that it makes me think not only did the maker of this film, hear about that, but if feels like, you know that they are maybe one of their, their relatives also got taken advantage of by chiropractor, because this guy really wants to line them up against the wall, basically. So anyway, so that's the story that at least explains the second section. Those two guys in this movie. "Yeah, this is great." That's them. I mean, it sounds just like looks like them too. So but you don't even need to know that to enjoy the first part, in my opinion. What did you guys think?

Tracy Harwood:

Well, I have to say back quacks are a thing in in UK too. I think it makes the point very nicely about the science used by these back quacks is wonderful. Really. It's very relevant, very nicely done. Like you say I forget the end part. It's it's not pleasant to see at all, even even in in the humorous way It seems to be put across I didn't really find it very funny. I did think the Australians were quite comical. But But to me, what they were doing was stereotyping Australians as well which I thought was particularly At least funny as well. So, yeah, those first few bits really worked for me. But the last bit didn't.

Damien Valentine:

Yeah, the same. The last bit. I was was like, why are we watching this? But of course, the first two bits are where the real humor lies. Actually, when I started watching it, just before I started watching it I was feeling the stiffness in my back. I thought this might be interesting to see how far they go with it. And then very quickly, so thinking No, no. I wouldn't want to see this doctor at all.

Tracy Harwood:

No.

Ricky Grove:

I had seen this film. A couple months ago, I came up in one of my Google searches, and I watched it and I really liked it. But because of the transgressive, vulgarity of the last section, which I'll go ahead and name in just a minute, I just didn't think it was appropriate to pick for us. So I'm really glad to see that you stoop to the low bar. Because it gives me a feeling of sort of self superiority in my taste. So thanks, thanks for choosing that, Phil. Everybody's gonna be wondering what the hell is it? It's the beating of a baby, they bring a baby in and he's going to do it and it's done very comically, there's no blood, there's no actual shots of him hitting the baby. At the end when the sort of hurls the baby. chair or carriage aside, you don't even see any anything in it. In fact, the baby is I've watched it several times the baby giggles all the way through it laughs through it, it would have been much funnier if the guy would have chosen that the baby beat the shit out of a chiropractor or keep jumping and being missed all the time. You could include it but when he steps into that arena, it's just chased us and vulgar just just doesn't work at all. Yeah. The guy is talented filmmaker. And it's interesting that G Mod, which is still alive, even after what, 15 years now, 20 years as a free pretty much near free $1.99 $2.99. From Steam. It encourages this farce, creation of slapstick farce comedy. Now, a lot of people see the Marx Brothers, they see The Three Stooges and they go oh, wow, I could do that. My sleep. Try it. You can't. One of my things as an actor training was sparse, learning how to do farce. I never really got it down. Even with a master's degree from a major drama school, because it is, for one thing, it's very physical. It's high energy. And it requires perfect timing. In order to make something funny people people in with people who watch farce or, or that kind of slapstick comedy know what that timing is, but they don't know how to recreate it, you know what I mean? So if you get it wrong, it's not funny, you get it, right. It's funny, this person using Garry's Mod, which is perfect for that, because it doesn't have a built in lip sync. So you have to physically move the mouse, take a picture and then move the mouse mouth. So he went through the entire thing and move this guy's mouth in absurd shapes to fit the which is funny in and of itself. And he's timing on all of the incredible physical, you know, when you do an adjustment, he did these impossible adjustments on this guy, you know, wherever you were to bones, hip bones don't go in that direction. And then of course, he has the broken salary or the dropped melon, you know, the crackle boy. And it's just so funny. The guy skill at being able to recreate that as just terrific. And then the voice acting, I thought was excellent that that sort of nasal, a voice for the doctor. And that sort of self aware, kind of I don't know how to describe it sort of leering at the camera like, Hey, I am so good, and you're gonna come and give me your money. You know what I mean? It has that low rent quality that you see on late night television. So I thought it was just absolutely marvelous. And cut out that last scene with the baby or change it around, I would have worked perfectly. He also has an interesting Let's Play narrative series called Jack's Mind, which he shot inside of Bioshock which is a POV of a player going through the Bioshock story going god damn it's so wet in here. Why? Why am I What the hell is this, you know, and he goes through the whole thing. It's like Freeman's Mind. He took it from Freeman's Mind, but it's Jack's Mind. It's very, very funny. He also has amusing Star Wars The Force Awakens. He uses Jedi Academy machinima which you might find of interest. He's a very talented filmmaker, and I wanted to know why he went off the rails on the the baby thing. He answers that, in a very short video he did called why I'd been away from the channel for so long. And it's him in his sort of studio with all of his his equipment and, and all of that, and then in the corners, there's a crib with the very same baby that's in this video in that video. And the guy basically says, Well, you know, I had a family and it caused me and while this is going on, the baby starts making noises. And so he has to speak up louder over the baby. Pretty soon, the baby just goes wild, and starts whirling around destroying the entire room around him, including all of his movie equipment, all of his computer just trashes everything, and ends up back in this broken cradle. Going. And he says, so that's why I've been away for so long. So now, what do you what? what that tells me is that he allowed his, excuse me for being a doctor here. But he allowed that unconscious hostility towards a baby who's demanding more attention that he wants to give to come out in the making of this machinima. And he probably shouldn't have. But at least I understand what the source of it is. Because if you watch this baby video, it's hilarious. It's absolutely hilarious. So it's not that he has hostility towards babies. It's that fatherhood thing, which Phil I'm sure you know, which is like sometimes you just want to strangle the kids, as opposed to patting them on the head, you know? So check him out. He's His name is Mr. McFlubberPants is the director's name, great name, which gives you a cute glue to the kind of point of view he has. But he's hilarious. It's very, very funny. Very, very funny stuff.

Phil Rice:

up our films discussion for this month. I'll remind everyone again, of the fact that we crave your feedback and interaction. And there are many different ways you can do that. If you go to our website completelymachinima.com Click the Talk button in the menu at the top, you'll see the various methods that you can contact us by email by text. I kind of a voicemail thingy. No one's used that yet. Really like someone to use that? Well. We will air your voicemail on the air if you want. And we've got a Discord server full of crickets. Welcome to drop something there. We're on Facebook. We're on Twitter, don't DM us on Twitter. There's only one of us maintaining that managing that account and that will get seen last but everywhere else. We got multiple eyes on it. We'd love to hear from you. like to thank my hosts co hosts Tracy, Damian and Ricky.

Damien Valentine:

My pleasure. Again,

Tracy Harwood:

Bye

Ricky Grove:

Great choices this week, guys. I always love your film choices.

Phil Rice:

Very enjoyable.

Damien Valentine:

Thank you.

Phil Rice:

We will see you at the next episode where we well the next episode will be an interview with a filmmaker. And then we will do an episode on some machinima discussion. So have a great afternoon, a great evening or great morning or if you're on Mars, whatever you guys have figured out to tell time there. Have a great Yeah. See you next time.