And Now For Something Completely Machinima

CM Interview with Tom Jantol, Anymation Director

June 17, 2021 Ricky Grove and Tom Jantol Season 5
And Now For Something Completely Machinima
CM Interview with Tom Jantol, Anymation Director
Chapters
And Now For Something Completely Machinima
CM Interview with Tom Jantol, Anymation Director
Jun 17, 2021 Season 5
Ricky Grove and Tom Jantol

Tracy Harwood conducts a fascinating interview of veteran machinima / Anymation filmmaker, Tom Jantol.

Full notes available at:
https://completelymachinima.com/2021/06/17/cm-interview-with-tom-jantol-anymation-director/

Show Notes Transcript

Tracy Harwood conducts a fascinating interview of veteran machinima / Anymation filmmaker, Tom Jantol.

Full notes available at:
https://completelymachinima.com/2021/06/17/cm-interview-with-tom-jantol-anymation-director/

Tracy Harwood:

This month we have had the chance to catch up with one of the great stalwarts of machinima, Tom Jantol, whose mantra is about making animation by any means: what he refers to as anymation. Our listeners will be aware of the experimental aesthetic style, he applies to his machinima creations and I love the fact that he calls himself Animatom some of his work, which displays quite frankly the most incredibly diverse array of approaches to creating machinima that I've seen. It is its diversity together with a distinctive style that has become somewhat of a cult phenomenon in machinima terms. I first saw Tom's work in 2007 when his film Cirque de Machinima won Best Experimental at the European Festival. But his work long predates this. So let's find out a bit more. Tom is great to have a chance to talk to you today and catch up after all these years and nice to talk without a Facebook page there as well. So tell us first of all, how did you get started in machinima?

Tom Jantol:

Oh, such difficult question for beginning. Okay. I started with of course, as every machinimist, if I can call myself like that, with a game. That was Max Payne first. If somebody remembers that game. It was unbelievable for me that some game that's something that is not film, that something that is not camera, can produce such a video quality. I was out of my mind and I didn't know that machinima exists at all. So, so humble me, I was convinced that I invented machinima. I was convinced that I was first who saw potential for video for filmmaking in game! Of course, after a couple days of research, I saw a whole movement behind it. But that was my beginning. I was a little disappointed that I wasn't first, of course. But nonetheless, I continued with with games

Tracy Harwood:

Absolutely. And when was this? This is about what 2003/4?

Tom Jantol:

You know, I don't know. I don't remember anymore. I knew Yeah, it was it was 15-20 years ago, I have no idea. After that was Max Payne 2 after that was Half Life 2, all these very, very friendly for filmmaking. So let's say that Max Payne first was really the first reader quality of that magnitude in the video game industry.

Tracy Harwood:

And this very distinctive aesthetic style that you have. How did you find that?

Tom Jantol:

Oh, I have no idea how I found that I think that style found me probably. I don't know, really, I could now talk about Eastern European roads and all these mythology, the poetry of puppetry of checks of Polaks, of Slovaks of Yugoslavia and what I was. So somewhere here is probably the answer. But probably the main reason was my, my belief that animation is I don't know last magic in the world. It is the it is a wizard, it is something unbelievably potent for anything that goes in your mind. And usually in your mind is chaos, and animation is perfect tool to make some form out of that chaos. And this is my movies, that cares.

Tracy Harwood:

I see. Yeah, that's that's Es, isn't it? Is that the I see. So well, to to a question that Phil was quite curious

Tom Jantol:

I knew Phil will come up with something, with about in your work. He, he was I think all of us have detected this kind of symbolism and abstraction that you have throughout your body of work. Where did the symbols come from? And you know, how do you carry them forwards across the body of work that you produce? such an abstract symbolic question! Again, I don't know again, like you said, like in previous questions here somewhere, but maybe because the way I work on movies, let me explain. When I start the movie, I never know how it will end. I have no idea. I have some foggy idea of what I want to be inside, but, but I have no idea how it will end; how any of my characters will end. So I have obligation to every second to listen to my character to listen, to my story actually, but mainly the characters, and to make them to decide what to do in the next frame, in the next scene, in the next happening, in the movie. And this is quite intensive labor mentally. This is unbelievably hard actually, for anybody who doesn't understand what I'm talking about. You can't, you have to deal with stuff on separate levels. So technical, of course, of consistency, of all these filmic rules, story one? Let me just Wizard of Oz. The Fish Incident. Yes. characters. So back to the point, I think that this symbolic this this abstract, little sparks that I'm carrying around in, in my movies, in some particular movie, such a great reminder for me what I'm talking about. It helps me to carry my own thoughts, consistently from scene to scene. I know it all sounds abstract and symbolic, but that's the closest I get. So let's say that, for example, in the movie, you will like you said you like

Tracy Harwood:

yes Cirque

Tom Jantol:

was that that or one?

Tracy Harwood:

No, no, that was my favorite.

Tom Jantol:

Yeah, but I think other movie one. I have a I have a one fish who is who is some ecological thriller, let's say who is carrying pollution around. And my first thought I will write to us fish was my I was very angry against church something that remind I still am but gain, never mind. So as a symbolic for Christian church, I said the fish as a symbol for Christian Church will be the perfect, perfect symbol for pollution of our minds, our politics, our daily lives, our own lives about on all planet. So I was carrying that fish from the scene scene and not knowing what will happen to my my mind main character this summer robotic character that was and that fish reminds me in every next scene what I have to do with him, with her, with idea, with pollution, and, of course, at the end. Exactly. I won a big award for that and as I have to say, guy who was reading the explanation why I get this award, get it! He get it, I wouldn't believe that he understand that fish is a symbol of Christianity, and I was against pollution of the free mind and blah, blah, blah, blah. That guy was really scarred by the way. But he gets it. I was I was out of my mind with happiness.

Tracy Harwood:

Do you know what I had not got that until you just was talking about that? I've seen that film many times and it's only when you started talking about fish that I realize we have people driving around with cars with fish symbols on their, on their cars to indicate that that

Tom Jantol:

fish is the maybe the oldest be behind besides cross of course.

Tracy Harwood:

So what about the puppets because you use a lot of puppets. And they're, you know, they're very reminiscent of Pinocchio and you know, the Grimm Brothers type stories.

Tom Jantol:

Yeah, yeah. Well, I was thinking before this interview about my movies, and I have a conclusion that all the time I'm practically making just Pinocchio stories; practically in every movie, even if he is not Pinocchio, and doesn't call himself like that, its practically Pinocchio. But this puppetry have have a very good reason that is not very strong anymore but I think it's so became part of me that I will continue. The first reason when I, first time and I started to use puppetry and not characters because I hate hyper realism and all these in animation, was after the war in my country, it was a big bloody war, blah, blah, blah. I was part of it, I was a soldier in it. And when I came out and that was in the same time when I got diploma for film directing when I was starting to think about movies as my profession and to think about visuals in my head, I decided to never, never use the human being as a character, as an actor. That's why I'm not making real movies. Because when I saw what people can do to each other, come on humans, go to hell, I don't want to do anything with you. Not in my work at all. So I promised myself not to use any human character ever in whatever I do. So my of course, next choice goes puppets and somehow I continuing because I hooked up on this everlasting Pinocchio story that I can continue to the rest of my life to examine and work in.

Tracy Harwood:

Its definitely has evolved, but it always reminds me of the Pinocchio story for sure.

Tom Jantol:

Pinocchio is the story of all stories. I don't know, this is the real Bible, actually, the something wooden in that case that wants to be man, who wants to be human, of our humans who have to deal with all this stuff to become human. And in my movie, one of my movies, Dear Fairy, she became, she is disappointed. So what now, okay, dear fairy I became a human, come on, I want to go back and be a toy, because she didn't see anything worth living as a human for. So I think this is the story I will continue to explore.

Tracy Harwood:

I love that film. That was a great film.

Tom Jantol:

Thank you. This is my favorite film of my movies. Is it? Yeah, I'm glad you like that. I mean, the other one I wanted to ask you about was you. You also seem to sort of revisit Charlie Chaplin a little bit in your work. I remember doing the world premiere of the one that you called The Kid, I think it was called. Yes. It's not on your channel, though. It's not on my channel?

Tracy Harwood:

No. You remember the one, it was an old BBC film that you mixed with?

Tom Jantol:

I know. Of course, I know. That. But I didn't know that it wasn't on my YouTube channel. I think it is on Vimeo. Yeah, yeah. I'm so glad that you remember that. That you saw that movie? Nobody ever mentions that movie. It is, like,

Tracy Harwood:

I was fascinated by it. Because you know, the way you brought Chaplin to life and and then showed him in that scenario, but then you also destroyed him in it. And that was I was very intrigued by that one as well. Tell me a bit more about that one.

Tom Jantol:

Way over Charlie Charlie Chaplin. We don't have to say he's genius, of course. But this movie I still watching Charlie Chaplin every now and then. And I still laugh and I still can't believe how smart this humor is. But in that time, it became was that time was beginning of one of my obsessions. I have a lot but one of those was the public domain materials. I when I figure it out, what amount of unbelievably good stuff are everywhere, I mean, on online, somewhere, digitalized and ready to not just consume to watch but to use. Nobody have rights for example for The Kid, nobody have rights. So you can use it and that was my, I again, I couldn't believe my eyes and ears and heart. Is it believe? Is it possible that I can make a movie where I can say on the on the title Charlie Chaplin and Tom Jantol. This time machine is this... I know you asked me probably because of some deeper meaning of the Chaplin or what is happening in his that? And sorry I answer in this.

Tracy Harwood:

No, no, I do remember that discussion that we had. Because I remember I remember I was talking to the BBC at the time about their back catalogue of old movies and how they could be reused and they they were thinking about how they can make that library available to people such as machinima filmmakers, but I think it never really went anywhere. And yours was the only film that I ever really saw that even attempted to do it and so i was very fascinated by it really.

Tom Jantol:

Yes, I believe you. Public domain stuff unbelievable and I like the idea of of re-using I like the idea of of some art piece, piece of movie in this example is not dead. I mean this is afterlife for movies. Come on, use it; cut part of my movie and use it if you're using good... a couple of days ago one one guy on YouTube did that and he sent me the message and what I liked... sorry, can I tell that, it was not part of the answer to the question, but okay

Tracy Harwood:

no problem carry on.

Tom Jantol:

He used the audio from one of my movies, Crazy Talk movies movie, just a bunch of heads that were saying one point and put even music that I had in the background so audio completely mind with his different picture, different heads, different stuff. What I liked about it was very well made if it wasn't I will be mad but what I liked he didn't ask me for permission, he didn't nothing, he just made that movie and later in the film on the facebook page he said thanks to Tom Jantol, he allows me... I didn't allow nothing but thank you for for forgetting me for giving me the opportunity to make my movie on based his movies and stuff. That was beautiful, he was so so certain I think, that's the background, he was so certain that he can use well, that he can use, and he did it so well that some of the stuff I wanted to tell with my heads and my idea that movie. He said it better, some parts are really better. He gets the meaning and he even make a step further so how to be made about it and that's what I'm talking about public domain. I don't want to say that my movies or any of our machinima community or whatever we are a public domain but the reuse of something is philosophy i like very much.

Tracy Harwood:

Well I think it's great to hear that the work that you produce is inspiring others, isn't it

Tom Jantol:

Oh, yes, of course. This I was so honored, humble.

Tracy Harwood:

Well so does his work inspire you to try different things as well and is that is it kind of a two way process?

Tom Jantol:

But yes, yes but you know that this is that I don't know we are all standing on the shoulders of giants right so so we take the part of every... yes I do. I didn't have time to check other of his movies or this particular person but I will because again it wasn't easy for him to make something that is more similar to my original idea that my movie so so I will check a couple of times what he did with my movie or who knows maybe I will make a remake based not so much on mine but based on his! It will be interesting.

Tracy Harwood:

That's what you call recursive i think! Yeah. Okay so I know some of the work that you've produced over the years has been for competitions, how does that process of thinking about doing something for a competitive context inspire you? Does it does it help you develop your approach or are you just sort of using it as a as a help to get a timeline to deliver something?

Tom Jantol:

Oh I love competitions, I love competitions very much. I can't skip one if i see one. The reason why is that with my movies when I'm working on my movies of course I have too much freedom and this is I think the curse of everybody who is making some kind of art. To hell with freedom; freedom is overestimated. Just give me borders in which I can find my own way to expand the borders and blah blah blah you know all this stuff. So these contests are perfect for that. For example, some contests it is make a movie make a 3 minute movie about spring. Okay I can make make 24 hours movie about spring but let it be 3 minutes, let's have one male and one female character, use that music and use that software and maybe you can use help of some other software... every competition of that kind give me so much borders, so much conditions that I love to destroy, to think inside of them, and to try to expand them, but to stay inside, and it's a perfect... I don't know the mind exercise, the skills exercise, everything exercise. And like I said, just everybody who can cut my freedom is welcome.

Tracy Harwood:

Do you get a lot of feedback from that process as well? And do you use it at all? Or are you are you just sort of doing it for you know, bounding your own approach?

Tom Jantol:

Feedback from whom?

Tracy Harwood:

From anybody that, you know, from the competent, competitive process? Do you get feedback from that? Or is it just stick it in? And it either wins or it doesn't?

Tom Jantol:

But yeah, but you know, I have a problem with my, my mangling with competition is that what I said now, but I somehow always manage to so expand that borders, that at the end, it became really my movie, some Tom Jantol movie that everybody who knows my movies to expects. So, at the end, this is just one of his movies. But again, it is beautiful exercise. Some of those movies that I did for contest are some of my best movies. So contests or not they managed somehow to find what was good in Tom Jantol's repertoire.

Tracy Harwood:

Yes, exactly. Tell me a little bit about the tools that you're most impressed with using now. I know you've been using iClone in your work for forever but are there new things? Or I mean, there seem to be loads of new tool sets around nowadays but are there new things that you're using now? Or are you sticking to the old ways of doing things? What what are you currently up to?

Tom Jantol:

Well, I'm using everybody that that I can get hands on. iClone is beautiful, because it can be used as a sort of melting pot for everything else. So I can, most of the time, I'm using Unity, and I'm using Unreal Engine. Finally, we have free engine, game engines out there. I'm used everything, literally everything and put it back into iClone to edit and to finish stuff. That's practically my line of work. And what I like the most is maybe this is part of if I may say so, charm of some of my movies, I like to use these tools in a way that nobody uses at all that are not predicted to be used. For example, Unity engine is beautiful for modeling. And when when I say that to somebody who use Unity for filmmaking, he look at me as if I am nuts. It is you know, so using something that is not prepared for as something else and then melting in iClone that could be recipe of me.

Tracy Harwood:

So anything and just turning it around and using it

Tom Jantol:

really anything. Why not to as you said the Charlie Chaplin all the movie, of course, in Dear Fairy, I use this is also ridiculous, I use Notepad, I use notepad for for some scenes, where poem is visible on the screen. Notepad in the video making! So everything that we have around us can be beautiful, beautiful source of unbelievably interesting things.

Tracy Harwood:

And this is to the heart of your Anymation.

Tom Jantol:

Yeah, exactly. This is this is Anymation. This is exactly that.

Tracy Harwood:

And, and And along those lines, this, this idea I saw where you had said at one point that what you're trying to do is dissolve the boundaries between 2d and 3d and and that also gets to the heart of the Anymation idea?

Tom Jantol:

Yes, yes, yes, this boundary is artificial. It is of course imposed by technical technical technicality of both worlds, but who cares again, with animation in mind, who cares is something to the effect. Of course all what you have to be, all for what you have to care is how to melt it unseamingly. And with unseamingly, I don't mean that you put all 3d to look like 2d or other way around but to keep the beauty of both worlds in the same time. This is, again one of my obsession for years how to have a 2d and 3d that live together not killing each other, not pretend to be each other as 3d often pretend to be 2d and 2d to be 3d, but to co exist. And I'm very, very close to one solution but I suppose you will have questions something about future or something. So I will tell you not now!

Tracy Harwood:

All right, well, but before we get to that I was going to ask you said something really interesting earlier that you allow the story to emerge as you're, you know, creating. Do you actually start with a storyboard at all? Do you attempt to do a storyboard or?

Tom Jantol:

No, no, no, no, no storyboard is my mortal enemy. Exactly. Exactly. Because of because of that process. For example, that Dear Fairy movie. I had every desire to put Pinocchio through many, many things and to make him happy ending on the end. Why not leave your little Pinocchio your deserve? Of course he died at the end. And I certainly did as I wanted but every scene I made it every next scene every next scene was telling me more about this Pinocchio or should I say Pinocchio told me more about himself. And he literally didn't allow me to to make anything else so every scene... and I'm working in the timeline and that is linear. You know, I make a first scene then the second scene then the first scene I never work economically like I should. So I'm yes I'm develop, I'm trying to put into story to develop characters to develop themselves because who am I to interact, you know, they have, they continue to have some kind of life on the screen. Even out of your hand after your mind, but they really started to be alive at that point. That's probably sounds cheesy, I don't know. But they shut my ability to be a master. They are the master, they are humble masters. And they guide me what to do with them. So

Tracy Harwood:

I think your your style of work is just such a unique and beautiful example of... well, I think it's been called experimental machinima, but it's actually just amazing digital art really, I think that's probably what I would do.

Tom Jantol:

Thank you very much for that. In one in one festival in Italy, it was near and Dear Fairy movie, and some people were crying. Some people were literally crying at the end of the movie.

Tracy Harwood:

It's beautiful. It really is a I've watched it so many times and on YouTube, it's got you know, a couple of 1000 views and whatnot I think 500 of those are probably me!

Tom Jantol:

Thank you for that. Just continue, just continue!

Tracy Harwood:

Sorry about that! Okay, so you know you've been in this game a long time now, tell me about how the attitude of the machinima and virtual production communities have changed from your perspective over the years.

Tom Jantol:

I you know probably very well, Phil and the Ricky knows also I'm in constant battle with machinima as a term, as a community, as a philosophy, because I never really understood what what is behind it. What that really means. I remember when I started with this Max Payne and Half Life 2, this community was nice, sympathetic, every community with fellow artists have somebody who is making movies collecting stamps or anything they're doing together, of course, they started to like each other, they love each other. We are doing something together and this is all great and nice. But majority of those people back then was gamers who came into movie world. I was a movie maker who came into game world so I never really understood this philosophy of making machinima in one engine and be happy with it. I was I always had problems with them. Okay, what that, machinima is just a tool, real time engines are just a tool. It's still like a pencil, like anything else. Don't be, you know, don't be abducted by by that tool. Think with your head, what's with that movie afterwards. You have no copyrights for that you can't send him on festival I don't want to live in this cozy little environment of our friendly machinimist and we are talking about each other movies. I want my movie to have life by his own on some festivals. So, so pretty quickly. I got in very, very nasty debates with with many of machinima authors about machinima itself. I started to call it dead, machinima is dead, doesn't exist anymore, and stuff like that. But I was listening.

Tracy Harwood:

I can see why you would say that. I mean, it's it makes perfect sense now you've described, you know where you've come from with it from the from the arts side of things.

Tom Jantol:

But yeah, but we are making movies. We are not making movies out of the game engines because we want to make game engines usable for making movies. No, we are making movies. Just use it as a tool. And again, this copyright stuff struck me struck me badly. Really, I was using Half Life 2 for a movie, I also got some award on machinima, some festival course for that, and I wanted to send him something further. And they said no, no. Because this major character was practically very similar to character from Half Life 2. And I said enough, luckily iClone started to grow up at that time so I jumped to iClone. Your question was about community, I have no idea I have no idea really, who is making machinima movie? What kind of machinima is what is going on with it? I have no idea. I will gladly be part of it but as an outside figure, not as a game engine. You know,

Tracy Harwood:

Completely understand that. And, and well, I was just going to ask what's next in the world of machinima for your work. But really what I'm asking is what are you up to now? And where are you going with your work?

Tom Jantol:

Oh, that's the question I was waiting for! Can you take half an hour or hour for that?

Tracy Harwood:

Please do tell me. It's really great to talk to you about this.

Tom Jantol:

I have I mentioned a couple of times my obsessions. I have lots of them. They're coming. They're dying then and so one of the one of the longest ones, and it is the most obsessive one, more than 3d, 2d, more than any mention, more than anything is what documentary in animation. I think I still didn't see... this is incredible, even after 100 years, I still didn't see an animated documentary. Of course, we saw animation as a base for documentary; we saw beautiful stuff, some get Oscars, some get many awards, but I never saw a documentary that is dealing with animation itself. And this is my obsession. Okay, just one more sentence. I will be more understandable. All these tools we used you asked me now about then we can we can mention million of tools. So I have a feeling so take it for granted. Now we take the Unreal Engine and VR... ooh what a beautiful picture unbelievably hyper realistic. I can put anything in it and it will look great. Okay and you are right you can but the engine itself when I started to discover this engine years ago; what is behind is the mechanics of the engine, of the tools, of 3d Max of iClone even, it started to be more interesting that majority of movies made with those tools. For example, you... ordinary example, you put one character somewhere you copy and paste in somewhere else. Well try that with your neighbor if you if you can. So these tools that are behind all that are so lyrical, are so advanced, so poetic, so ready to use like like little orphans that everybody takes for granted and nobody cares for them. So I wanted to use tools as stories and this is tools as a story what I said now the copy-paste, I really, come on, try that or with a neighbor or with with your wife or with your... no you can't but you can't and you think this is your your right to do so. So because of 1000s and 1000s of people are working of those two are these mechanics of this this magic that you just use to make something that will satisfy your couple let's say now machinima friends but no this is too big, too important, to to again poetic tools itself to not be used as the parts of the story.

So finally my answer:

I'm making documentary big big be constructed to be the development is documentary but now I'm 20 something minutes so it's a probably full hour documentary about one character from the game engine, Unreal Game Engine that he started to think hell what I'm doing in this engine. I was part of the game, some game, but he has some some idea of memory, some memory, little, little blanks some sparks of memories of his character; his 3d model that was used in previous game that was completely out of genre and completely other dialogues completely other everything, completely other psychology, if we can call it like that of that character. So he started to remember the parts of his previous roles, previous characters and this is your and he's basically He's practically searching for himself; well I was that, I remember how to ride horse from that game, I remember how to make some chemistry formula from this game. Wait a minute, can I... what can I ask I can do so let's let's It is very simplified but it's something like that. So he here is full hour continuing to search around this inside these engines, inside of these tools even iClone inside he is going literally behind the menu we see on the on the screen you know or some some other stuff you just click; is going behind is watching what is this doing how to do that, how to do that, and he's starting to do that's some stuff inside the engines toying, investigating those tools. And this is story I think very good story by itself. But it is it is perfect for documentary. Documentary that will deal with tools itself. And of course on the on his on his bed, he is meeting other characters who are unsatisfied with roles they have now but remember something else so blah, blah, you know, you can imagine what kinds of this is very, very potent idea and it's again perfect for documentary. So shortly my answer finally would be the documentaries I will think I will go completely into into documentaries because this couple of minutes I did already showed me that I can't; I don't have to forget I can't even if I want the poetry of let's say my expression in movies. I don't have to abandon the style; I don't have to change anything. Anything that is making my movies mine as Tom Jantol could be part of documentary movies. I don't want to even, I don't have to say that big big parts of that documentary movies are my movies. I'm showing what some character did. He was not some game just the game characters but the movie characters this currently you know, we are using 3d for everything. So it is practically documentary about this character; its practically documentary about my work; its practically documentary about all this together. All these in the documentary form. Celebrating the tools, tools, all these worlds behind the screen this we are taking so so easily for granted all the time.

Tracy Harwood:

It sounds like a Tom biopic!

Tom Jantol:

But yeah, I knew it came out this was my problem in Dear Fairy in some moment I realized, Oh hell, I'm making movies about me. Some some stuff that happened to Pinocchio happened to me and of course I have to put that because I know how it feels. So this also somehow started to look like Tom Jantol about Tom Jantol inside of Tom Jantol... I don't know!

Tracy Harwood:

Yes, yes. I'm sure there's a metaphor in there somewhere. When are you when when are you thinking this is going to be released?

Tom Jantol:

Oh, this will be released pretty soon. I have to finish with these interviews. I have to finish with some some competition movies. I have one contract with Reallusion now. It will be finished. It will be finished before the summer. That's, that's for sure. Well, I'm sure when it's finished... Sorry, Tracy. You have a part of that movie already online. If you?

Tracy Harwood:

Is it the Reallusion Headquarters?

Tom Jantol:

No, no, no. That was just a joke about them. No, no. It's a trailer for for my movie.

Tracy Harwood:

Something Coded This Way Comes?

Tom Jantol:

Yes. That. Ah, here it is.

Tracy Harwood:

Is that the one? Something Coded This Way Comes?

Tom Jantol:

Yes, yes, yes, yes. Jesus, it was years ago, you see?

Tracy Harwood:

You're gonna finish this by the summer?

Tom Jantol:

I will because really, the big part is done.

Tracy Harwood:

I'm slightly worried about your sense of time here.

Tom Jantol:

You are absolutely right, a year ago.

Tracy Harwood:

I hope that gives me the right then to chase you about where is this film?

Tom Jantol:

Please chase me around 2027. Yes, but this is the trailer for that movie. Jesus, why YouTube keep years?

Tracy Harwood:

Yeah, well, it's fully one year ago, as we speak.

Tom Jantol:

Okay, virus stuff, you know, life.

Tracy Harwood:

Yeah. I know. And anyway, I'm sure we need to wrap this up now. You need to go and go with this film.

Tom Jantol:

Oh, yes.

Tracy Harwood:

Which everybody now is really looking forward to hearing more about and in the meantime, Tom, thank you so much for taking the time to chat to us on the podcast today.

Tom Jantol:

Thank you for calling me, it is honor.

Tracy Harwood:

You're very welcome. I'm sure we'll be speaking again at some point in the future as well.

Tom Jantol:

I hope so. As you can see I can speak for a long, long time.